Zambia Update – May 6, 2015

Africa.  There’s nothing polished about it. It is raw and gritty.  But God can certainly use it to expose and make us vulnerable.  It’s not for the weak or faint of heart….however, if you can by Christ’s power bear up under it, then I believe something beautiful can emerge for God’s honor.

March.  In March we celebrated Faith’s 12th birthday.  Thank you, by the way, to those of you who remembered to wish her a Happy Birthday.  It was by far the most different/difficult one for her.  Thankfully, we were able to get her a cake, and the Wiegands were kind enough to invite us over for a swim!  Good times.

05.06.15 Birthday Party

Faith’s birthday party

Faith and Grace have made some friends here in Africa.  Almost daily the neighborhood children come over to the house to play.  It is sweet to see this interaction….and my heart is warmed to see our children making friends.

The neighbourhood children

The neighbourhood children

We are heading into the winter months here in Zambia.  It would be equivalent to our fall season.  Cold crisp mornings, with hot clear sunny days, and cooler comfortable temperatures in the evening. It’s actually quite beautiful.  Because we’re heading into the dry season, there are many shortages of water and electricity.  We have water early in the morning, but then it cuts out for most of the day, and turns back on in the evening.  Lately, the electricity has been turning off in the evening.  The other night the WHOLE COUNTRY was without power – I believe that a dam broke, and ALL businesses ground to a halt.  Some were blessed enough to have generators which gave them a couple of hours of electricity.  You can imagine what it’s like to be sitting in complete darkness…..it certainly makes for interesting conversation.  This would be the perfect opportunity to share life’s most embarrassing moments (nyuk nyuk).

In other news, we  had the ministry of health administer the tetanus vaccine at the school.  Just about 450 children lined up over a two-day span.

A government nurse administers the tetanus vaccine

A government nurse administers the tetanus vaccine

05.06.15 Vaccine 2

Also, Bro.  Adrian Brdarski was kind enough to arrange a donation of new soccer jerseys which we brought with us in February.

Handing out the jerseys to the soccer players

Handing out the jerseys to the soccer players

The soccer players

The soccer players

At the school – there’s so much work to be done!  Bob Waite (I mentioned him in an earlier blog post – the Texan educator) stressed that our class size is simply too large.  We will be running a babysitting service and NOT a school unless we split the classes.  There are currently 50 – 60 children per class – any educator reading this would probably be cringing right now.  This is a huge struggle! Yes, feeding the kids is key – but if we’re going to make a DIFFERENCE in the lives of these children, then we must do everything possible to ensure that we TEACH them as effectively as possible.  Another issue that is setting us back at this point is the fact that the kids do not know English.  You may think that’s arrogant of
me…seeing that I’m from the West, but you have to understand…..the CURRICULUM is in….English!   All the exams are in English!  This frustrates some of the progressive teachers as well!

Currently the school children are on break……classes resume on the 11th of May.  Dennis and I are preparing the teachers for the new term, while Sarah is helping Faith and Grace with homeschooling.  When the new term starts, Sarah goes back to the school early in the morning and helps the cooks with the feeding program.  She has been trying to train the cooks to work efficiently, so that the feeding program runs smoothly.  Also, Sarah along with Faith and Grace were painting at the school this week.  The paint that they use here is so watery that most of the paint ends up on the painter and not on the wall.

The girls painting the classroom

The girls painting the classroom

05.06.15 Bathroom Wall

The Canadian flag - our nation strong and free!

The Canadian flag – our nation strong and free!

The garden - we will use the vegetables to feed the children

The garden – we will use the vegetables to feed the children

The gate after it has been fixed – refer to the original post for a “before” picture

The gate after it has been fixed – refer to the original post for a “before” picture

A message to the community

A message to the community

The school motto

The school motto

Zambia Update – March 21, 2015

Visiting the Lifesong School in Garneton

Last week we had the privilege of being invited to a seminar that was hosted by the team at Lifesong Garneton (Garneton is about 30 mins away from us – this is where some of the members of the Apostolic Christian Church of America work).  Dr. Bob Waite, a principal from Dallas, Texas, was presenting a topic, and two van loads – including all the teachers and Ken – from our school went in support of this event. Dr. Bob spoke about a number of things, but he emphasized the point that the primary purpose of a teachers is to lead his or her pupils to Christ. Beyond that, he gave the teachers some pointers on how to stay focused in the classroom and to stay on point in the lesson. Furthermore, he encouraged the teachers to be diligent in both areas of life; as believers and as teachers. We were really excited to be able to meet him, and were ready to bombard him with a series of questions after he was finished presenting. He has been to Zambia a number of times, so he is well aware of what the educational system is like… or lacking.

Dr. Bob teaching

Dr. Bob teaching

Shane (Zambian director for Lifesong Garneton school), Dr. Bob Waite, Dennis and Yasna

Shane (Zambian director for Lifesong Garneton school), Dr. Bob Waite, Dennis and Yasna

On Sunday, we were pleased to have Eric Weigan, his family, and Caleb visiting with us at our home for morning worship. Eric and his wife Kerry are from the Sister Church in Indiana, and Caleb is a Brother from Bloomington, Illinois. Eric is quite prolific at playing the guitar, so we sang hymns and Dennis led the bible study. We read from John 15, where Jesus likens the Christian walk to the vine.

ACCA group over for bible study on Sunday.

ACCA group over for bible study on Sunday.

Dennis had the cafeteria doors fixed so that it would discourage the community from stealing the food stored inside. Also, some of the children would manage to squeeze through the bars and vandalize the inside of the cafeteria.  Dennis was commenting that it is so different when you’re here long-term, rather than on a 2 week work team trip.  There’s always something going on that needs repair, or general supervision.

Welding the cafeteria doors

Welding the cafeteria doors

On another note….the other day I asked Grace if she wanted me to book a flight home. She replied, “I would really love to Mommy, but I know that God wants us here, so we have to stay!” Out of the mouth of babes…


Zambia Update – March 7, 2015

Extra! Extra! Read all about it! Harmony Community School starts feeding program! 

The day finally arrived! The children at the Lifesong Harmony Community School enjoyed their first meal yesterday. Approximately 500 children were able to eat breakfast at school thanks to the various donors back home!

Leading up to the event, there was a lot of running around and preparatory work that had to take place. Dennis and Kenneth were busy buying all the necessary supplies (large stock pots, burners, food stuffs etc.). As Dennis was purchasing the supplies, he choked up a number of times, because he was humbled by the fact that he was able to be a part of this amazing event!

On the actual day, the team woke up with butterflies in their stomachs! Off to the school they went! Sarah, Faith, Grace, and Jaz got to work buttering the bread, while Dennis, Kenneth, and Victor took care of some last-minute details. Other members of the community, the cooks, and the Delic/Weinhardt team spent the morning hours preparing the cafeteria for the big event. Excitement was in the air!

Cleaning up!

Cleaning up!

Washing dishes!

Washing dishes!

The cooks

The cooks

Setting up the tables

Setting up the tables

Faith and Grace helping set up!

Faith and Grace helping set up!

Dennis and Ken

Dennis and Ken

The girls buttering the bread

The girls buttering the bread

As the cafeteria was bustling, the local tv station arrived! At last, the children came in single file, excited to partake of their first school meal. One of the community members commented that this was probably the only meal that some of the kids had for the past couple of days. Sad.

The people are coming! The people are coming! Primary school lining up for breakfast

The people are coming! The people are coming!
Primary school lining up for breakfast

Washing hands before eating

Washing hands before eating

T.V. Crew! Full cafeteria

T.V. Crew! Full cafeteria

The meal consisted of fresh buttered bread (the Zambians love their bread!), a hard-boiled egg, and tea with milk. Before the children partook of the meal, a speech was made by the school’s coach (also a school board member), Kenneth, and Dennis. A prayer was offered (all being broadcasted – you have to love Zambia for that!) and the children began eating. Everyone was touched, some were even crying! This was a long time in the making, and so emotions were heightened! There was a lot of work that went into this event, but it was worth it – more than words can express!

Pots which are used to prepare the food

Pots which are used to prepare the food

Eggs are ready!

Eggs are ready!

Buttered bread, hard-boiled eggs, and tea! Breakfast!!

Buttered bread, hard-boiled eggs, and tea! Breakfast!!

Cafeteria filled to capacity!

Cafeteria filled to capacity!

Zambia Update – March 6, 2015

The events of the last year have turned my physical and spiritual life upside down. I’ve heard about trusting in Jesus since I’ve been in Sunday School, but to be honest, I’ve never really FULLY relied on Him. I’d be lying if I said that I did. Shocking? Perhaps. But sadly it’s the truth.


The last 8 months or so, have had me relying on Him for everything. I’m holding on tightly to Jesus.

Spiritually speaking I’m trying to sow seeds that will yield an entirely different harvest. To my shame, ones that I’ve never sown before. Ones that don’t focus on vanity, discontentment, and selfishness. I’ve been sowing those kinds of seeds for far too long. It’s time for me to put someone else’s needs before my own. Truthfully, this is foreign to me. It actually doesn’t FEEL good at the moment. I can only liken this state of being to having an unhealthy diet. If I’ve trained my body to be used to sugary, salty and fatty foods, then when I suddenly change to a healthier lifestyle, my body will still crave the bad food that I was accustomed to before. I would need to retrain my whole body to crave the new healthy foods. The transition period may not FEEL good but…..I think you get my point.

In this new phase of my life where I’m trusting God for everything (yes, I know, I’m a really slow learner – gentle with me please) some really neat things have happened that I’d like to share with you.

First of all, as I’ve mentioned in the last blog, the books have arrived at the school!! YAY!!! Seems silly, but they didn’t have a curriculum to follow before. Sigh.

Secondly, they DO NOT HAVE ANY SUPPLIES to work with at the school!! AARGH! It’s sad – really sad. Dirty, tattered and ripped up “notebooks” is what they currently are using. So off to the market with Dennis and Kenneth to buy new supplies. Big Smiles. After perusing through a number of stores to find the best price, we finally found a store that would offer us each book for 4 Kwacha (.74 Cdn or .60 US – btw, Dennis pulled me aside and lectured me on being outside of my budget which was 3.50 Kwacha per book…..don’t worry Willie he’s got your back :)). I insisted on these books because they would not rip or tear as easily as the cheaper quality ones. After putting our order in of 500 books, and paying the 2000.00 Kwacha (370.00 Cdn or 303.00 US), the Indian owner inquired as to why we needed so many books. Dennis told him about the school and the organization we were with and he seemed to be quite touched. He asked us what other items we needed, and he brought us some of the other things that were on the list. After doing so, he proceeded to give us back our 2000.00 Kwacha and said that he wanted to donate the books, and asked if we would be interested in him donating some canned foods, diapers, and other feminine hygiene items……..? Sniff. Why am I surprised??!!?? Don’t we serve a God who owns the cattle on a THOUSAND HILLS?!? When will this truth take root in my heart?

Old workbook (made out of newspaper)

Old workbook (made out of newspaper)

New donated hardcover workbook with new pencil and eraser

New donated hardcover workbook with new pencil and eraser

NEW CURRICULUM TEXTBOOKS!!!

NEW CURRICULUM TEXTBOOKS!!!

Zambia Update – February 27, 2015

Care and Compassion

Today Sarah went to visit one of the Care and Compassion groups.  In the interest of providing some background, the Care and Compassion ministry takes care of widows and widowers by providing food and teaching them life skills.   One of the skills is called micro financing.  Rather than just  giving them food, we help them get back on their feet again by helping them start their own business. They borrow money from the group, and then pay back the loan at a fixed interest rate.

The group Sarah went to visit today had a few people who were involved in selling dried fish, another was selling coal, and yet another was selling gravel.  Victor (the Care and Compassion coordinator) encouraged the group to press on through the various challenges they encounter as widows and widowers.

Care and Compassion group

Care and Compassion group

Zambia Update – February 10, 2015

This is from Dennis and Yasna’s blog, which will be posted here to keep everyone updated on the work they are currently doing in Zambia.

After a tearful goodbye, we were ushered off through the gate with one final farewell prayer offered up on our behalf.  We finally settled onto the airplane preparing ourselves for a long and arduous journey to Zambia, Africa.  Other than narrowly missing our connecting flights a couple of times, our trip was rather uneventful. ;)

We finally arrived on African soil on the twelfth of February!  It was hot, muggy and ironically enough, we missed the cold Canadian winter that we were so excited to leave behind!  We arrived at the rental house to find the plumbers working steadily to install running water so that we could at least shower inside the house.  Before we left Canada, Dennis warned me that the landlord might not have time to organize plumbers to come and install the running water before we arrived in Zambia.  If that were to be true, then I would be taking a shower with a hose that would be fished in through the bathroom window! Needless to say, I was very happy to see them!

We spent a couple of days running errands and trying to settle in and adjust to the life here in Africa!  Dennis and I had a lengthy meeting with Kenneth and Victor.  They were pleased to know that the fundraising went well, and that we would begin feeding the children as soon as we purchased all the necessary supplies.

Dennis has been running around trying to find us a car, visiting the school for morning prayers, and preparing our papers so that we can stay in Zambia long-term.

At the school, Sarah and I spent a couple of days observing each class and reported our “findings” back to Kenneth. Currently the teachers are not using a curriculum which makes teaching extremely difficult!  That has changed since we’ve come and we are expecting the new books in the next couple of weeks!  Everyone at the school is really excited!  Teachers and students alike!  Many thanks go out to the donors back home!

On a rather sad note, our Senior Teacher’s son died suddenly at the age of 24.  Another sad piece of news is that Frieda’s (our Care and Compassion volunteer) son was involved in a very bad car accident resulting in two fractured legs. Also, on Friday, one of the student’s mother passed away in her sleep.  Two of the teachers went to represent the school, and we purchased beans and some staple food items to help the family with the funeral preparations.

One of the problems that we’ve encountered at the school since we’ve arrived is that the students are boring holes in the wall fence.  They do this so that they can play soccer on the school field after school hours.  One solution to this problem is to install a couple of gates.

Earlier this evening Faith was struggling with missing family and friends.  She sat quietly in the corner with tears falling down her cheeks.  I tried to comfort her, but I find myself struggling with some of the same things.  I have to believe that we are investing our time and effort into something far greater than we can understand at this point.  Are we outside of what we are comfortable with?  Yes, without a doubt!  Yet, I believe that we have a purpose here… and that’s what keeps me going.

Dennis addressing the children

Dennis addressing the children

broken-gate

The broken gate

future-garden

Future garden

holes-in-wall-fence

Holes in the wall fence

moringa-tree

Moringa tree

sarah-teaching-with-preschool-teacher

Sarah assisting the preschool teacher

Zambia Team Blog – August 29, 2013

Today we were digging the holes for the swing set.  Some of these holes were quite difficult to dig as we ran into some very large rocks, which needed to be removed.  Once this was completed, the swing set was installed and levelled, and the concrete was poured to anchor it into place.  This took all day to do.

Several large used tractor tires were delivered to the school yard to all to the children’s playground equipment.  These were donated by a construction company called Girder Engineering from Kitwe.  Robert Jr. sat next to the owner of this company on the flight into Zambia, and through conversation, Robert was invited for a visit to his fabrication facility.  We ended up purchasing the pipe for the swing set at a reduced price from this company, and then he also offered to donate as many tires as we wanted for the school.

Marlene also had the opportunity to walk through the nearby village with one of the teacher’s to see the homes and living conditions of some of the children who attend the school.  One family had six children sharing one bedroom which contained only one bed.  The oldest boy, age 21, sleeps on the bed, while the remainder 5 children sleep on the concrete/stone floor.

Thursday evening, Marlene, Ryan, Jamie and Jacobi spent preparing and getting organized for the trip home on Friday.

George finished up the final coat of paint on the swing set on Friday, and then also left for home on Saturday.

Everyone on the team feels incredibly blessed by the experiences and relationships made while in Africa.  We are especially grateful for the work that was accomplished and the progress that was made with the school projects. We praise God for His goodness and protection upon us while here.  May He continue to bless the ongoing work and ministry of Stacey’s School of Hope according to His perfect will and purpose.

Starting to dig for the swing set foundation.

Starting to dig for the swing set foundation.

This rock needs to come out!

This rock needs to come out!

Team work

Team work

The old tires being put to a new use

The old tires being put to a new use

Almost complete

Almost complete

Mission accomplished.  Once the concrete is hard, the kids will have fun!

Mission accomplished. Once the concrete is hard, the kids will have fun!